Category Archives: Blog

PC Problem Solved

My PC is back. Apparently, there’s just a problem with the operating system, and the guys in the repair shop did a great job of fixing it. It’s running smoothly as I type! But there are a few things that tugged at my heart strings.

Having the PC fixed actually cost me a few memories. When I first bought my PC, I digitized some of my old artworks. Basically, I just took pictures of them and saved them in a folder called “Artesanctum.” Also, I backed up my old blogs in tidy XML files that Blogger sends when people order a backup. I put them in the “Blog Things” folder. When the hard drive of the PC got reformatted, of course, they’re gone. This is just sentimentality speaking, though, and I’m sure I won’t die because those files are gone; instead, it looks like it’ll give me some practice with the art of letting go.

I’m sure I won’t die because those files are gone; instead, it looks like it’ll give me some practice with the art of letting go.

On a more practical note, the PC repair cost me a considerable amount of money. I paid P800.00 or roughly $19.65 using the prevailing interest rates. Arguably, it’s still better than not having a PC, so I really can’t dwell into it.

My heavy heart is starting to become lighter as I am finishing this post, and soon, I think that I’ll soon forget these small yet painful tugs at my heart. I am still able to paint and write so it’s just a matter of making new memories — happy ones — that will make me fall in love with my PC all over again.

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Scheme and Theme for February 2013

I have so many tasks left undone because my computer got busted. For one, I was supposed to publish another story for the Ivory Tower chronicles, but I was not able to last weekend. I also wanted to post something about and for my online class, but I can’t. It — my inability to get my PC fixed — is starting to get on my nerves, and I can’t do anything until the next pay day comes.

Thank god for my android phone and my cousin’s laptop!

It’s February, and I planned a lot of things this month. I had an outline of posts already that are all centered around love, which is the theme that I chose for this month. It’s cliche — I know! But hey, pocket books still sell and love songs still dominate the airwaves, so yes, I’m sticking with my guns. I just hope that I can get the PC fixed this weekend so that I could get a lot of posts out that’s all about love. I’m hoping to migrate an old love story into Kraken’s Ink, and write new ones, too. To keep this fresh, I plan to look for uncommon ideas about love, but it might be easier said than done.

I’ll still continue migrating my old compositions into this blog, but for the moment — or more exactly for this month — I’ll be writing about love. Stay tuned!

PC Problem

I was planning to watch a movie on my computer. I turned it on, but it seemed to have gotten stuck somewhere while loading the operating system — much like what happens to me when I try to get water and suddenly, someone calls my name. Like what happens to me, it derailed its train of thought and failed to finish what it was supposed to do. So the plan to watch a movie remained a plan, and I’m without a computer.

I didn’t feel the full force of this loss until my phone beeped at me. The reminder on my phone said, “Online classes start tomorrow!” I know that I’ll definitely find a way to manage my classes: I could just use my office computer; I could rent one in a shop; I could borrow my cousin’s laptop. That’s me trying to be the guy that looks at a glass half full but I’m really feeling that it’s half empty.

I might sound cliche, ugh but here goes nothing — my computer and I have already been through so much since 2006, and I can’t bear the thought of losing it. We’ve made and killed so many blogs together. We’ve stayed up late to read, write, watch movies, and even design blog themes. It knows all my passwords, too, so I rely on it so much. It’s like my best friend if I didn’t have one already.

There’s so much to be done and so little time and money for me to use and this happened.

Can anyone tell me how to fix it?

Foundations of Fan Fiction

Last week, I’ve written about what fan fiction is, and why it attracts people. If you haven’t read those, you could click Shedding Light on Fan Fiction and Understanding the Allure of Fan Fiction. Now, it’s just fitting that I ask and answer the most practical question for people who want to write some for their favorite movie, comic book, or TV series: how do you write one? According to my sources, Moviebuffgirl and Ingenious Macabre, writing good fan fiction all boils down to faithfulness, originality, and letting loose.

Being faithful to the original material is the life blood of fan fiction since it is what the writers and readers of the genre want to see. According to Ingenous Macabre, it’s all about knowing the source material by heart. Moviebuffgirl explains this in depth:

I watch the movies the characters are in again and again. If I don’t have the time, I consult their Wiki pages (if they have one). But for the three fan fictions that I have that are all in the Left 4 Dead fandom, I play the game multiple times just to see how they act, speak, talk, walk, react to certain situations, etc. I even downloaded an audio from YouTube that has a compilation of their lines and dialogues, so that I can listen to the way they interact with each other.

It looks like a lot of work, but you’re not a true fan if you aren’t willing to do the research, right? Itemizing the elements of what Moviebuffgirl shared, it’s basically the principles of characterization: name, age, appearance, role, personality traits, motivations, and even style of speech. All these are laid out in the canon – or original work – which an aspiring fan fiction writer should watch out for.

Of course, faithfulness to the original should be balanced by originality since everyone in a fandom knows the story by heart. In Shedding Light on Fan Fiction, Moviebuffgirl says that her main tool is to use original characters or OCs, which she says is a gamble because they’re generally disliked by readers. She explained, “I know most people don’t like OCs in fan fiction, because of the author’s tendency to make them into Mary Sues (imagine a perfect character whom everyone loves and can do no wrong), which is why I do my best to make them as realistic as possible.”Additionally, she says that she thinks of new challenges or events for the characters. When I went to Ingenious Macabre’s answer, she offered a different way for me to look at the genre and the writers:

I think anything written from the perspective of a fan is most likely very different from the source origin already. Fans are crazy (including myself), and we tend to get a little imaginative. But as for originality, the real trick is to separate oneself from the rest of the other fanfic writers out there, who were privy to the same source material.

She refers to little headcanons or each fan’s personal interpretations of how the original is like and should proceed. It reminded me of the time I read one of the Star Wars novels, which was written by someone who’s not George Lucas. I could tell the difference, even if the characters, dialogue, and settings were the same, but again, I wouldn’t have read that book if it was just a text version of the story.

The third element – the element of letting loose or having fun – is my synthesis of certain parts of their answers. Ingenious Macabre goes directly to the point: “Have fun. You’re not writing if you’re not having fun. Live through your fiction, and your readers will be able to tell that you’re enjoying it. They’ll enjoy it, too.” The other part of it came from their answers when I asked about their inspirations. Moviebuffgirl’s answer implies that she welcomes elements from other creative works. She gave an example story, “Stark Contrast,” which she said was inspired by a part of Nickelback’s “Far Away”: “Cause with you, I’d withstand all of hell to hold your hand.” Moviebuffgirl then added that “after hearing the song, I had most of the plot in my head.” If that’s not fun, I don’t know what is!

After reflecting on the interview notes, it sounds to me that writing fan fiction is not as hard as it seems. Keeping up with the original could be done by observation; adding a piece of originality can come from different sources like original characters, headcanons, and even the writers’ personalities; of course, there’s letting loose, having fun, and welcoming inspiration. Hopefully, this three-part discussion about fan fiction can inspire you to write your own, and if so, feel free to share your fan fiction in the comments section!


About My Sources

Moviebuffgirl

is a 23-year old movie fanatic who has spent most of her life in front of the typewriter (and now, the computer) churning out stories by the dozen. She likes nothing better than watching a good movie, listening to music, and playing with her dogs. Now, her attention is spent on creating interesting fan fiction and improving her writing craft, writing stories based on Charmed, Underworld, Twilight, Phantom of the Opera, 300, Dawn of the Dead, Land of the Dead, Resident Evil series, Walking Dead, Tudors, Left 4 Dead, Thor, Avengers, and Borgias. To check out Moviebuff girl’s stories out, click this link.

Ingenious Macabre

says that she doesn’t write as many fan fics as much as she reads them. She’s not afraid to share the love by victimizing others with her incessant fangirling. She currently has two stories for based on the fandoms for Pitch Perfect, and she is part of the Sherlock (BBC), Doctor Who, Marvel Cinematic Universe, Suits, The Vampire Diaries, Once Upon a Time, and Cover Affairs fandoms. You could read Ingenious Macabre’s stories by clicking on this link.

Understanding the Allure of Fan Fiction

In my previous blog post, I wrote about fan fiction and what it is by interviewing two fan fiction writers, Moviebuffgirl and Ingenious Macabre. I thought that I would be able to compress all the information that I have gathered in just one post, but when I finished my draft, I was surprised to see that it went over 2000 words! Obviously, there’s so much to write about it, and instead of doing it all in one go, I decided to do a series of posts about fan fiction instead.

As a writer, I tend to focus on original works because I’m drawn to the idea that I’m able to create a world that ticks at my bidding. Since fan fiction is deeply rooted on an existing body of work, it is different from what I am used to, so I wanted to figure out why it attracts other writers. According to my sources, fan fiction gives them satisfaction, ease in writing, and a sense of community.

Fan fiction is mostly created by fans, and as fans, they want more out of it. “Sometimes, when we get engrossed in a particular world, the end comes as such a downer, and we, as the fandom, want more. Fanfiction gives that,” said Ingenious Macabre. Moviebuffgirl further explained that sometimes, the ending is just not enough. As an example, she mentioned that she was not satisfied with how Phantom of the Opera ended, so she created an ending for Erik and Christine where they got together and had kids. Ingenious Macabre metaphorically treats those as “bonus scenes” or “DVD extras” of movies. With that kind of explanation, I felt that I could relate to them more because that’s exactly how I felt when I bought the director’s cut of The Lord of the Rings trilogy; I wanted more from the story despite its already lengthy edited version.

In terms of writing, they both say that it makes story writing so much easier. According to Ingenious Macabre, “Writing original fiction is difficult (this is an understatement), but fanfiction makes it easier, because then, you wouldn’t have to worry about the characters anymore. They’re already fleshed out in the minds of your readers, and you just have to fill the little gaps in between.” Those little gaps offer a “sense of freedom” that “gives you [fan fiction writers] the chance to fill in the blanks, so to speak,” added Moviebuffgirl. This particular point is relatively easy for me to relate to since I know how much goes into creating original characters; if the character creation stage – not counting how their personalities develop inside the story – could be skipped, yes, I’d also say that it’s definitely easier to write fan fiction.

Finally, it sounds like fan fiction writers feel a sense of belongingness since they have their community — also known as their fandom — online. One such example of this community is Fanfiction.net, where both Moviebuffgirl and Ingenious Macabre publish their stories. Ingenious Macabre also said, “There is a lot of positive energy generated by people who are into the same fandom that you are, and it’s a community of sorts.” Looking at one comment for Ingenious Macabre’s story, “Endings,” a person by the username piratesmiley said, “THIS IS THE GREATEST STORY. I am so ridiculously intrigued. Please please please update soon!” That’s pure, unadulterated acceptance and approval, and who wouldn’t want that, right?

With those reasons, I’m now able to understand why fan fiction draws people in. It satisfies the fans’ wishes for additional content, which they themselves can control by penning what ever they want. It offers ease in writing, and it also fosters a sense of community. Who wouldn’t want that? I sure would like all of that, and the only question is how to do it. Of course, I’ve asked about that question during the interview so I’ll be posting Moviebuffgirl’s and Ingenious Macabre’s answers in the next post. Please stay tuned!


About My Sources

Moviebuffgirl

is a 23-year old movie fanatic who has spent most of her life in front of the typewriter (and now, the computer) churning out stories by the dozen. She likes nothing better than watching a good movie, listening to music, and playing with her dogs. Now, her attention is spent on creating interesting fan fiction and improving her writing craft, writing stories based on Charmed, Underworld, Twilight, Phantom of the Opera, 300, Dawn of the Dead, Land of the Dead, Resident Evil series, Walking Dead, Tudors, Left 4 Dead, Thor, Avengers, and Borgias. To check out Moviebuff girl’s stories out, click this link.

Ingenious Macabre

says that she doesn’t write as many fan fics as much as she reads them. She’s not afraid to share the love by victimizing others with her incessant fangirling. She currently has two stories for based on the fandoms for Pitch Perfect, and she is part of the Sherlock (BBC), Doctor Who, Marvel Cinematic Universe, Suits, The Vampire Diaries, Once Upon a Time, and Cover Affairs fandoms. You could read Ingenious Macabre’s stories by clicking on this link.

Shedding Light on Fan Fiction

50ShadesofGreyCoverArtWhen I first heard that 50 Shades of Grey came from a fan fiction about the Twilight saga, I couldn’t believe my ears. How could that have happened? From my previous encounters with fan fiction, I know it to be a genre that focuses on adaptations of another existing body of work, so I decided to investigate. I read in Wikipedia that E. L. James rewrote the story into something truly different, which shifted my focus to learning more about fan fiction; it sounded like a powerful entity, considering the fact that Time Magazine considered E.L. James as part of their 100 most influential people of 2012. I tried to learn more about the genre by interviewing two fan fiction writers, Moviebuffgirl and Ingenious Macabre. The interview proved to be most illuminating since they helped me confirm what I know and learn more about fan fiction.

Through the interview, I confirmed that the definition I knew was accurate. Ingenious Macabre said, “Fanfiction is the art of creating fictional writing out of previously-established universes. Basically, they’re stories and/or scenarios that incorporate the characters, as well as other elements, of the source material, and are created by the fans.” Moviebuffgirl specified that these previously-established universes refer to films, television shows, and books. Based on her body of work, it could also span video games since she has stories made for Left 4 Dead. That last bit was new to me since my original concept of it only included anime and manga, and the interview further expanded my definition of the genre.

Based on the definition, it’s natural to think that fan fiction would include the same plot elements from the original work but it can include more than that. Moviebuffgirl mentioned that fan fiction writers can inject original characters or OCs into the stories, which is one way of adding originality in their work. On other times, the stories are entirely different since some writers opt to write about alternate universes or AUs. To clarify, Ingenious Macabre gave an example: “For instance, I wrote a story about a college movie, and transplanted that entire universe into a spy setting.” Judging from the name of the genre alone, I could not have guessed that those are possible.

Confirming what I know about fan fiction is good, but learning more about it is even better. More than just writing about what is, this genre pushes the boundaries of the original work that they so love using OCs and AUs, and now, I’m not so surprised that something like 50 Shades of Grey came out of this genre. Perhaps, there’s more to come since writers and other creatives do not stop producing new books, TV shows, and films, and fans will most likely expand on those, too!


About My Sources

Moviebuffgirl

is a 23-year old movie fanatic who has spent most of her life in front of the typewriter (and now, the computer) churning out stories by the dozen. She likes nothing better than watching a good movie, listening to music, and playing with her dogs. Now, her attention is spent on creating interesting fan fiction and improving her writing craft, writing stories based on Charmed, Underworld, Twilight, Phantom of the Opera, 300, Dawn of the Dead, Land of the Dead, Resident Evil series, Walking Dead, Tudors, Left 4 Dead, Thor, Avengers, and Borgias. To check out Moviebuff girl’s stories out, click this link.

Ingenious Macabre

says that she doesn’t write as many fan fics as much as she reads them. She’s not afraid to share the love by victimizing others with her incessant fangirling. She currently has two stories for based on the fandoms for Pitch Perfect, and she is part of the Sherlock (BBC), Doctor Who, Marvel Cinematic Universe, Suits, The Vampire Diaries, Once Upon a Time, and Cover Affairs fandoms. You could read Ingenious Macabre’s stories by clicking on this link.

Scheme and Theme for January 2013

“Resolutions would mean that there’s a problem in my life. I’ll write goals instead since there’s so much for me to achieve.”

~Ken

During the Roman’s time, they named the first month of the year in honor of Janus, the god of doors, gates, beginnings, endings, and transitions. To gain his favor, I am dedicating this month to writing posts that would follow the theme of being “new” while hauling my old stories from The Velociwriter into the Kraken’s Ink.

I have a couple of posts that I’m writing at the moment. One’s an about a realm of writing that I haven’t explored yet, and with that post, I hope to shed light on a world that’s mostly shades of gray  from where I stand. The other is mostly my way of learning about new things — by asking questions to people. I hope that those posts can bring inspiration to others so that they, in turn, could bring about new things into this world.

If you’ll notice, I’m not writing resolutions for this year. It’s because one of my friends at the office told me that if he wrote resolutions, it would mean that there’s a problem in his life. Instead, he told me that he would write goals instead since there’s so much that he wants to achieve. What he said makes sense, so I’m following suite; in writing this post, I’ve set two goals for myself to achieve, and of course, I am already hard at work to achieve them. Please stay tuned!